Helping Educators and Students Affected by Harvey

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Helping Educators and Students Affected by Harvey

By now, you are aware of the devastation in Texas.

Hurricane Harvey, with its record-breaking rainfall, and resulting aftermath has left countless people in desperate need. While recovery efforts are just beginning, the outlook is dire. There are an estimated 50,000 homes destroyed with estimates potentially as high as 100,000 homes for a final count, over 32,000 displaced individuals in overcrowded shelters scattered across the state, and analysts are forecasting grim predictions of an energy crisis.

As educators, it is impossible not to think about the number of P-12 students affected. The new school year – typically a time of optimism and hope – is now uncharacteristically challenging for many. There are Texas schools unsure of when or if they will reopen, and the situation is heartbreaking.

Now, more than ever, we must consider the significance of the Whole Child Initiative. This holistic philosophy posits that for a child to be educated successfully, the child must be healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. As educators, we must amplify our efforts to invest in the future of Texas students and school districts that are presently facing major obstacles. While Texas natives and others are rallying to help Houston and other coastal cities, it may not be enough.

Below, we’ve compiled a list of resources to support Texas during this difficult time, and to provide confirmation that educators, schools, and ASCD members come together in times of need, demonstrating that we are pillars of leadership, service, community and charity.

Here are some ways you can help:

Educators are immensely creative and passionate – and know best what will be needed when teachers and students can return to the classroom. Collaborate with your team and develop resourceful ideas to incorporate the Whole Child Initiative with support for Texas Schools.

TEXANS THANK YOU!

Dr. Yolanda M. Rey, Ph.D. and Laura Stubbins, Texas ASCD